Solid Perfume Forums General Discussions Imposter Compacts? Re: Imposter Compacts?

Sandra
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Post count: 2188

QUOTE(zooey @ Aug 3 2009, 02:02 PM)
Are you serious?  You wouldn't by any chance know where he hangs out, would you.  Hopefully not in the Dark, Spooky Forest.  This one I'm going to have to google.  I say there's no such thing as a Tasmanian Devil….I'll be back.  <img src='style_emoticons//unsure.gif’ border=’0′ style=’vertical-align:middle’ alt=’unsure.gif’ />

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<img src='style_emoticons//cool.gif’ border=’0′ style=’vertical-align:middle’ alt=’cool.gif’ /> Of course I'm serious !! Go ahead, google him. You'll see he looks very much like the cartoon character when he's howling his head off ! <img src='style_emoticons//laugh.gif’ border=’0′ style=’vertical-align:middle’ alt=’laugh.gif’ />

Margaret – I just googled him myself and found this:

Devils once occurred on mainland Australia, with fossils having been found widely. But it is believed the devil became extinct on the mainland some 400 years ago – before European settlement. Devils probably became extinct there due to increasing aridity and the spread of the dingo, which was prevented by Bass Strait from entering Tasmania.

Today the devil is a Tasmanian icon. But it hasn’t always held this status. Tasmanian devils were considered a nuisance by early European settlers of Hobart Town, who complained of raids on poultry yards. In 1930 the Van Diemen’s Land Co. introduced a bounty scheme to remove devils, as well as Tasmanian tigers and wild dogs, from their northwest properties: 2/6 (25 cents) for male devils and 3/6 (35 cents) for females.

For more than a century, devils were trapped and poisoned. They became very rare, seemingly headed for extinction. But the population gradually increased after they were protected by law in June 1941.